EDMONTON CLINICAL HYPNOTHERAPY 
Edmonton & Area Clinical Hypnotherapy, Cognitive Behavioral Hypnotherapy, Neuro-Linguistic Programming & Positive Psychology/Executive Coaching. Hypnosis for Life. T. Cooper RSW, NLP-M, MSc. (Masters in Social Psychology) DCH. (Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy)
             #108 25 St. Michael Street, St. Albert Medical Center, St. Albert T8N 1C7.
By appointment: 
(780) 418-1973   
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Edmonton Hypnotherapy CEO Daily Mindset Newsletter-18
subconscious mind review

In the last email (see email 17) I suggested that by moving our influence inward we can begin to alter our self-perception. Deciding how we wish to see (and experience) ourselves rather then being at the mercy of past and external messaging is a process.


Our internal dialogue is an important factor to consider.

We all talk to ourselves. Some of us mumble quietly, some of us mutter aloud. But the wheels are always turning in our minds. We are in constant internal dialogue about: ourselves, others, and the world around us. We are always gathering information, making assessments, and using internal discourse to validate our experience and beliefs.

Getting a handle on our self talk is one of the most powerful things that we can do for our well-being. When our internal dialogue is unhealthy it impacts us personally and it “leaks” out into our interactions and relationships with others.

Once we begin to understand the subconscious mind and develop a respect for its power we realize that we must take charge of our internal dialogue. Out thought habits must be consistent with what we want.

What most people do not fully appreciate is that runaway thoughts are programming the subconscious mind through their intensity and repetition.

The subconscious does not question what you tell it. That is the job of the conscious mind, to analyze and reach cause and effect conclusions. The subconscious mind is a servo-mechanism, we give it a goal and it responds based on mind files, references and memories that have been stored over time. We must begin to see thoughts as prompting the goal seeking behavior of the subconscious mind. Thoughts are words and visual representations (the pictures we form in our minds) that trigger emotional states. Thoughts trigger emotional states that have been habituated over time.

The subconscious mind does not question whether an emotional state is relevant in the here and now.

It takes some discipline to develop new internal dialogue or thought habits, but it can be done. We do this through training and repetition.  Like anything, what we practice becomes easier.

The goal is to make sure we are practicing what we truly want to keep.

This effort must be made consciously. Managing our thinking by day allows the subconscious mind to process information behind the scenes, even while we sleep.

Here is a challenge for you:

  • Take a few days to really pay attention to your inner dialogue. You may be surprise by how negative you are about yourself, others, and the world around you. 
  • Try asking yourself what you were just thinking before an emotional state was triggered. 
  • Ask yourself if the state you created is in your best interest. Does it serve you? Does it uphold the self-image you wish to step into?


Terri Lee Cooper MSc. RSW

The majority of individuals who access services at Hypnosis for Life have, at one time or another made good use of: 1) traditional clinical psychology services  2) medication  3) community counselling, 12 step programs and/or treatment centers.

These options provide initial needed relief, however, relapse is common. Challenges tend to re-occur until the subconscious mind has fully accepted and absorbed new paths of least resistance.

Past client experiences

EDMONTON-HYPNOSIS FOR LIFE

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